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Faculty Fellows

The Tisch Faculty Fellows program convenes a diverse group of faculty members from across Tufts University for interdisciplinary discussions about teaching and research and builds the capacity of Tufts faculty to integrate civic engagement into their work. Faculty Fellows develop a course, research project, or other initiative designed to strengthen the connections between their individual disciplines and civic life. They receive a stipend that can be used for salary or research/teaching expenses, and they meet four times per semester to share perspectives and discuss common themes, challenges, and resources. To date, more than 100 colleagues, representing every Tufts school, have participated in the program, which is open to any member of the Tufts University faculty.

For more information about the Faculty Fellows program, contact Diane Ryan, Tisch College’s Associate Dean for Programs and Administration, at diane.ryan@tufts.edu.

Apply to be a Tisch Faculty Fellow for 2019-2020

Tisch College is pleased to offer fellowships to Tufts faculty from across the University to be Tisch Faculty Fellows for the 2019-2020 academic year.  Selected Fellows receive an award up to $5,000 for the year. Fellows may come from those with a Tufts faculty appointment(tenure stream or full time lecturers) or those who are benefits-eligible teaching employees (e.g., instructors in the life sciences).  Fellows are expected to participate in eight seminar-style discussions during the academic year and to complete their proposed project which has been approved in advance by Tisch.

2018-2019 Tisch Faculty Fellows

Thomas Abowd

Thomas Abowd

Faculty Fellow

Abowd's project, “Designing and Building a Digital Media Archive with Arabic Hour,” is a civic engagement initiative that involves designing and building a digital media archive with community partner, Arabic Hour, a Boston-based, non-profit television program. From its inceptionin the early 1980s, Arabic Hour’s dedicated volunteer staff has produced about 1,300 one-hour, weekly television episodes. These programs range from interviews with world-renowned scholars, politicians, artists, and activists to Boston-area cultural and political events organized by Arab and Muslim  Americans. Interviews, events, and talks include segments with internationally known scholars and activists like Edward Said, Noam Chomsky, Ella Shohat, Angela Davis, Ralph Nader, and others. However, though potentially an invaluable resource for researchers, students, and educators across the country, this treasure trove of historically and culturally rich materials have not, heretofore, been accessible to the general public, students, and scholars. Aboowd and six Tufts students involved in this archiving project have, over the last three years, begun to meaningfully advance one of  the very few civic engagement initiatives between Tufts and a Boston-based Arab and Muslim-American cultural organization.

Danielle Abrams

Danielle Abrams

Professor of the Practice

Danielle Abrams is a Professor of the Practice in Performance and a member of the Graduate Faculty at School of the Museum of Fine Arts.  Abrams is also the 2018 recipient of the Distinguished Artist Award from the St. Botolph Foundation.  Abrams’ performances emerge from the social forces that have shaped her multiracial identity as African-American, white and Jewish.  She adopts disparate personae and utilizes humor, and a blending of the past and the present, to illuminate the charged and poignant crossroads between racial and cultural groups.

As a Tisch Faculty Fellow, Abrams is developing a performance and archive that sheds light on the once segregated “Lincoln Beach” (1954-1963) in New Orleans, LA. Amidst the media’s reminiscences summoned by New Orleans’ 300th anniversary, critical reflections about Lincoln Beach are obfuscated by recalling the larger and better-equipped “whites only” Pontchartrain Beach Amusement Park. Abrams is conducting interviews with former Lincoln Beach patrons, and building a research form that can be donated to the African-American elders of New Orleans. Abrams’ project gathers stories from African-Americans about segregation, frustration and heartache but also provides the legacy of joy, kinship, resistance and survival.

Ndidiamaka Amutah-Onukagha

Ndidiamaka Amutah-Onukagha

Assistant Professor

Ndidiamaka Amutah-Onukagha, PhD, MPH, CHES is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. Her primary research focuses on mother-daughter communication, HIV prevention, and treatment for women of color. She is interested in group level, peer-based interventions to reduce health disparities and HIV in vulnerable populations.Dr. Amutah-Onukagha’s Faculty Fellow project involves developing a curriculum to increase health literacy in HIV+ women, and train them to be health ambassadors for their community and their families. The curriculum is developed with a focus on resilience and empowerment, and will be implemented in a community-based setting. As a health disparities researcher, she is particularly interested in strengthening the mother-daughter relationship to reduce HIV incidence, while utilizing methods that engage individuals and their families within a cultural framework.

Brian Boghosian

Bruce Boghosian

Professor

Bruce Boghosian is a Professor of Mathematics who also holds adjunct positions in the Departments of Physics and Computer Science. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and serves on several editorial boards. Boghosian is also keenly interested in issues of higher education in the developing world, having served as president of the American University of Armenia from 2010-2014, as vice president of the Association of American International Colleges and Universities from 2013-2014, and as a foreign member of the National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia since 2008. He has more recently served on the Tufts AS&E Advisory Group on International Programming, and as chair of the Tufts Subcommittee on International Programs. Boghosian's Faculty Fellowship will support his four-year-running research project on the Mathematics of Poverty and Inequality. Toward this end, he has led a group consisting of seven graduate and two undergraduate students (in AY 2017-2018), and has developed two courses on the subject (MA 150 / EC 193 "The Mathematics of Poverty and Inequality", and MA 10 "The Mathematics of Wealth Distribution"). The work of this group has shed new light on fundamental causes of wealth concentration and poverty, and these in turn have had reciprocal impact on functional analysis and stochastic processes. The group hopes to work on the broader dissemination of their results and their social and political implications during the period of the Faculty Fellowship.

R. Bruce Hitchner

R. Bruce Hitchner

Professor and Chair

Dr. R. Bruce Hitchner is Professor of Classical Studies and International Relations, and Chair of the Department of Classical Studies at Tufts. Hitchner has published extensively on the history and archaeology of the Roman World and has directed archaeological projects in North Africa and France supported by the National Geographic Society, National Endowment of the Humanities, and French Ministry of Culture. Hitchner was the founder and Chair of the Dayton Peace Accords Project (1998 to 2014), and a member of the international negotiating team that assisted parliamentary parties of Bosnia-Herzegovina in producing the April 2006 Package of Amendments to the Dayton Constitution. Hitchner served as the Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Archaeology(1998 to 2006).He has been a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford (2010), the Center for Human Values at Princeton University (2002 to2003), and Churchill College, Cambridge (1994 to 1995). He has also authored op-eds, papers, and interviews for the United States Institute of Peace, Center for Strategic and International Studies, ICDT, International Centre for Democratic Transition, International Herald Tribune/New York Times, and Wall Street Journal, He is currently writing a book on the Origins of the Roman Empire to be published by Princeton University.

Justin Hollander

Justin Hollander

Associate Professor

Hollander’s Faculty Fellow project, “Expanding Town+Gown Research Funding Opportunities in Greater Boston” seeks to develop a local program comparable to an initiative in New York City that provides a centralized system to solicit research funding contracts from city and state agencies and then shares them with university partners.  With Tufts serving as the lead institution, Hollander will work with Tufts staff in the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Office of the A&S Dean of Research, and Community Relations to invite the Director of the Town+Gown program in NYC to Tufts. She will be the keynote speaker at an event in the winter of 2019 where procurement officials and political leaders of the surrounding communities—Boston, Somerville, Medford, Cambridge, and others—would be invited to learn about the success of the New York effort. Hollander and the Tufts team will then follow up with each city to explore ways to replicate the Town+Gown program here in Greater Boston, with particular attention to the role that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts might play.

James Intriligator

James Intriligator

Professor of the Practice
Director, Human Factors Engineering Program

James Intriligator is the director of Tufts’ Human Factors Engineering Program and a Professor of the Practice in the Department of Mechanical Engineering (School of Engineering). He joined Tufts in 2016 to lead the university’s renowned Human Factors Engineering program into its next phase of innovation and growth. Intriligator is the author of over 50 publications in fields as diverse as neuroscience, neurology, consumer psychology, physics, and literary criticism.

As a Tisch Faculty Fellow, Intriligator will work together with Kevin Oye to create a new hybrid program focused on civic and social engagement. Specifically, they will guide students in researching, designing, and testing strategic social interventions that address civic and social needs. The program will be built around a local approach to design-led social interventions:  rather than addressing issues in other countries, this program will address issues in local communities. Over the course of the year, students will work in teams to research, design, test, and refine interventions in nearby communities in need.

Elena Naumova

Elena Naumova

Professor and Chair

Elena N. Naumova is a Professor of Mathematics and Chair of Nutrition Data Science Division at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. She is the founder of the Tufts Initiative for the Forecasting and Modeling of Infectious Diseases. She collaborates with experts in epidemiology, immunology, environmental, and computer sciences to model the spread of infections and health responses to climate change on the local, regional, and national levels. As a Tisch Faculty Fellow, Naumova will explore how data science connects with civic engagement. In the first half of the project, she will examine the issues of equity and inclusiveness in disaster risk reduction strategies with respect to data access, sharing, and communication. In the second half of the project, she will work with faculty and students to frame discussions on a broad spectrum of questions related to ethical dimensions of data sharing, access and communication, and on producing “actionable knowledge.” 

Kevin Oye

Kevin Oye

Professor of the Practice
Director, Innovation and Management Program

Kevin joined the Tufts faculty in 2016 to launch the Master of Science in Innovation and Management (MSIM) program, enabling recent STEM graduates to learn how to translate research and technology knowledge into high impact solutions that can transform society. Through multiple hands on venture creation cycles, MSIM students learn how to find problems that matter, create compelling solutions with scalable business models, and the leadership skills to persuade, negotiate, and lead others to drive impact, whether it be in the context of a for profit or a non-profit, a startup or an existing enterprise. Since the same innovation skillset and mindset can be applied to social challenges as well as commercial enterprises, Kevin looks forward to his time as a Tisch Fellow, working along with James Intriligator, to further develop the application of these skills for social impact.

Before joining Tufts, Kevin spent 35 years in the networking industry wearing many hats, including leading global strategy, research and development, and corporate acquisition teams while launching companies in China, India, and the U.S. He currently advises private and public companies, as well as serving on the leadership board for EforAll, a non-profit business accelerator in Lowell, MA where he mentors entrepreneurs, including social impact ventures that provide language translation services for Cambodian immigrants, create sewing kits for people with visual impairments, and build parent support networks for families with autistic children.

Susan Russinoff

Susan Russinoff

Senior Lecturer

As a Tisch Faculty Fellow, Russinoff will develop a new course, Philosophy for Young People (working title). This new course will be a companion to Philosophy 92: Philosophy for Children, in which undergraduates investigate the value of pre-college philosophy and work with children at the Eliot-Pearson School to engage them in philosophical discourse.  The new course will broaden the civic engagement component of the work with children, providing Tufts students with the opportunity to work with local schools, public libraries, and high school students.

George Scarlett

George Scarlett

Senior Lecturer

George Scarlett is a senior lecturer in the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development. In the past, his teaching and publications have focused on children’s play, approaches to children’s challenging behaviors, and religious and spiritual development across the life-span. More recently, his focus has been on teaching and writing about the development of ‘Earth stewards’. As a Tisch Faculty Fellow, he will be carrying out a research project at the New England Aquarium, a project studying the experiences of those teens who have been deeply involved in the NEAq’s most intensive programs. The project’s aim is to construct a model for defining and evaluating the developmental status of emerging Earth stewards as well as for identifying key supports for the development of Earth stewardship. The Fellowship will also be used to continue to develop a Tufts course on Children, Nature, and the Ecology Movement—and to provide opportunity for students to work closely with the Biodiversity for a Livable Climate organization, which promotes understanding of how eco-restoration can be our best hope for fighting climate change. Finally, the Fellowship will support ongoing work in the Eliot-Pearson Children’s School to develop this lab school into a model program with respect to connecting young children to the natural world.

Deborah Schildkraut

Deborah Schildkraut

Professor

Schildkraut’s Faculty Fellow project on the measurement and political meaning of white identity in the United States is aimed at broadening and deepening how political scientists understand the psychological and political roles that race plays for white Americans and how this identity is shaping political engagement. Using focus groups that she will conduct in New Hampshire, she will examine how white Americans interpret survey questions about racial identity, perceptions of discrimination, and their sense of linked fate with whites as a group. One aim is to illustrate the situational and psychological factors that render whiteness as a racial identity salient. Another is to explore the political ramifications of white identity, specifically, its consequences for political engagement. A final aim is to use insights from the discussions to devise appropriate survey questions.

Peter Scott

Peter Scott

Professor of the Practice

Peter Scott is a Professor of the Practice in the Print, Paper and Graphic Arts Department at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. Over the past 25 years he has been involved with print workshops and print portfolio exchanges between the Print and Paper area at SMFA and with colleagues and students in Johannesburg, South Africa. In particular, this has focused on collaboration with Artist Proof Studio, Johannesburg, founded and directed by SMFA/Tufts alumna Kim Berman in 1991, as well as with faculty and students at the University of Johannesburg, where Ms. Berman is also a Full Professor in printmaking.

With the incorporation of SMFA into Tufts University, Scott’s Faculty Fellowship will provide continued support for exchanges between the SMFA Print, Paper and Graphic Arts Dept. and Artist Proof Studio as well as the University of Johannesburg. Funding will allow for a print artist from Artist Proof Studio to come to SMFA for a two-week workshop in the fall. Initiatives also include running a corresponding two-week workshop in Johannesburg, where he will work with advanced students at Artist Proof Studio in the spring semester. In the summer of 2019, the department is looking forward to reinstituting a course that would travel to South Africa where students from SMFA/Tufts would be collaborating with students from the University of Johannesburg and Artist Proof Studio.

Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith

Lecturer

Patricia Smith has been a Lecturer at Tufts since 2003. Her Faculty Fellowship, “Historic Memory:  Connecting the Past to the Present,” will help develop a new curricular component for the course "Themes of the Spanish Civil War," which she has been teaching for the past eight years. The fellowship will allow Smith to seek out more guest speakers on issues of reparation and remembrance. In addition, students will again keep diaries and present a mini-conference at the end of the fall semester, in Spanish and English, with faculty members from other departments in the audience.  With some of the funds, he hope to take students to a conference on Civic Studies or on the teaching of history. In their diaries, they will reflect upon how they have been taught history and research, and how they believe the history of wars and genocide should be taught.  The class will also visit at least one museum of memory as a group, and students will be encouraged to visit others on their own.

Jacob Stewart-Halevy

Jacob Stewart-Halevy

Assistant Professor

Jacob Stewart-Halevy is an Assistant Professor in Department of the History of Art and Architecture. As a Tisch Faculty Fellow, he is tracing a history of the figure of “the bystander” across philosophy, social psychology, sociology, art history, and cultural criticism. This research will form part of a book manuscript tentatively titled The Behavioral Image, which explores the way artists and intellectuals produced and derived images of conduct during the Cold War period.

Allen Taylor

Allen Taylor

Senior Scientist and Director, Nutrition and Vision Research Laboratory, Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging

Allen Taylor is the Director of the Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research at the Tufts’ USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and a Professor of Nutrition, Development, Molecular and Chemical Biology, and Ophthalmology, Tufts University. Recently Dr. Taylor founded and became the Director of Science Training Encouraging Peace - Graduate Training Program (STEP). 

Based upon the concepts that diseases respect no walls and science knows no borders, STEP builds bridges across the socio-political divide between Israel and Palestine. STEP is a person-to-person, cross-border program that brings young Israeli and Palestinian healthcare professionals /scholars together and funds their education in pairs, in academic graduate programs in the health and medical sciences, currently in Israel. Each pair is comprised of one Israeli and one Palestinian.  STEP Fellows study intensively together for the full length of an MS, PhD, or certificate program in the same program or laboratory over a period of up to four years. Face to face, and day after day, they hone their skills and pursue answers to the region’s public health or medical problems.

Annie Wayne

Annie Wayne

Clinical Assistant Professor, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine

Annie Wayne is a veterinary criticalist who received her DVM//MPH dual degree from the Cummings Veterinary School at Tufts University in 2011. Her research interest is in antimicrobial stewardship and infection control in small animal veterinary medicine. She has partnered with the Infection Control Team at Tufts Medical School to apply current best practices of antimicrobial stewardship in human hospitals to veterinary hospitals. As a Tisch Faculty Fellow she aims to begin to implement best practices for infection control and antimicrobial stewardship at the Foster Hospital for Small Animals and to support research in the area.